#5874

Odanye Hezekiah
Keymaster

My definition of money has changed with time, depending on my prevailing situation.

As a little boy, my family didn’t have that much. Money then meant necessities to me. It was a tool for obtaining essentials of living, especially food. Sometimes it was the only way to get ice cream, biscuits, rent movies, etc. But mostly it was a means to obtain the things we needed to survive.

When I was a young adult, however, my attitude changed. My father had a successful business venture, so we had more money when I was in secondary school. I went to a college where I was more buoyant than most kids, so I had a lot of friends. I began to view money as power and influence. It helped me to acquire the luxuries my peers did not have. I acquired a lot of luxuries. I bought anything I wanted: books, computers, video games, gadgets, etc. I bought things even if I didn’t have the money, just to stay at the top of my peer. I wasn’t under pressure, I put my colleagues under pressure.

Now that I have reached middle-age, money represents freedom. For more than a decade I’ve been chained to the debt I accumulated while pursuing luxuries. I understand what a foolish choice that was. Now I see that money allows a person to pursue the things that are most important to him: friends, fellowship, vocation. If I want to stay home and write full-time, then I must eliminate all debts. I need to accumulate capital to support myself.

I have woken up to the realities around me. For more than a decade I’ve been chained to the debt I accumulated while pursuing luxuries. I understand what a foolish choice that was. Now I see that money allows a person to pursue the things that are most important to him: friends, fellowship, vocation.

Essentially, it helps an individual to have a befitting life.

Therefore, I create something of value and exchange it for money. Now, I can boldly say that money is what I get for solving other people’s problems which in turn helps me to solve my own problems.